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Demonstration at the Red Cross Emergency Ambulance Station in Washington, D.C., during the influenza pandemic of 1918 // Photo: Library of Congress

Demonstration at the Red Cross Emergency Ambulance Station in Washington, D.C., during the influenza pandemic of 1918. // Photo: Library of Congress

U of M researchers decode the Spanish Flu, advance in microbial ‘arms race’



The 1918 “Spanish Flu” was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, killing 50-100 million people. To this day influenza is a major health concern, having killed another 50-100 million people since 1918. The most recent pandemic was the H1N1 flu outbreak in 2009.



“Unlike some other noteworthy diseases, like Smallpox, the flu can infect many different animals including marine life, aquatic birds and other land animals,” said Kevin Coombs, a professor of medical microbiology in the Max Rady College of Medicine at the University of Manitoba. “Therefore, there is little chance of eradicating the virus and the virus’ genetic plasticity allows the flu to rapidly mutate to evade vaccines and anti-virals.” 



A new study, published in EBioMedicine by lead authors Coombs and Dr. Darwyn Kobasa from the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and co-author Dr. Charlene Ranadheera, PHAC, succeeded in measuring thousands of dysregulated cellular proteins. They noticed that many proteins not identified in earlier studies were affected by the Spanish Flu.

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