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Migizii Agamik (Bald Eagle Lodge)

Migizii Agamik- Bald Eagle Lodge celebrated a 10 year anniversary.

Top Indigenous stories of 2018

December 17, 2018 — 

As 2018 comes to a close, we reflect on some of the top stories that celebrate the successes of the Indigenous community at the U of M. From student success to Indigenous faculty, staff and alumni recognition to Indigenous spaces and artwork on campus, these stories highlight many milestones and accomplishments from the past year.


Former AFN national chief receives honorary degree

During the 51st annual Fall Convocation at the U of M on Oct. 17, 2018, an honorary degree was awarded to a tireless advocate for Indigenous rights, Ovide Mercredi. Read more.

Ovide Mercredi

Ovide Mercredi receives an honorary degree.


Two new Vanier Scholars call U of M home in 2018

Two Indigenous U of M graduate students are recipients of 2018 Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships, each receiving $150,000 over three years towards her research. Read more.

2018 Vanier Scholars, Taylor Morisseau and Iloradanon Efimoff.

2018 Vanier Scholars, Taylor Morisseau and Iloradanon Efimoff.


Celebrating 10 years of community

A long-time dream became a reality in 2008 when Migizii Agamik – Bald Eagle Lodge officially opened its doors at the U of M’s Fort Garry campus. Read more.

Migizii Agamik – Bald Eagle Lodge.

Migizii Agamik – Bald Eagle Lodge.


U of M prof named one of Canada’s most powerful women

Dr. Marcia Anderson from the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences has been named as one of Canada’s Most Powerful Women in 2018 by Women’s Executive Network for bolstering Indigenous medical education and health-care delivery in Northern Manitoba. Read more.

Dr. Marcia Anderson

Dr. Marcia Anderson


10 individuals honoured at second annual Indigenous Awards of Excellence

The second annual Indigenous Awards of Excellence recognized the tremendous accomplishments of Indigenous students and – for the first time – faculty and support staff, who are going above and beyond to make the U of M an inclusive and supportive learning environment. Read more.

10 people honoured at the Indigenous Awards of Excellence.


Métis sash to be present at all U of M convocations going forward

For the first time this year – and every year going forward – a Métis sash was present on the podium for the U of M’s convocations. It is customary to have a sash present at all gatherings, meetings and celebrations where Métis peoples, history and culture are being discussed or recognized. Read more.

(From L to R) Teresa Byrne, Laura Forsythe and Christine Cyr with the Métis sash that will be present on the podium at all U of M convocations going forward.


Trailblazing doctor wins 2019 Indspire award

Dr. Marlyn Cook, one of the first female Indigenous physicians to graduate from the U of M’s Max Rady College of Medicine and now a physician with Ongomiizwin – Health Services, has been named a recipient of the national 2019 Indspire Award for her career working on reserve lands and advocacy work to reshape medicine in First Nations communities. Read more.

Dr. Marlyn Cook.

Dr. Marlyn Cook.


Three-time U of M grad to provide Indigenous voice

This year’s election saw an unprecedented 25 U of M grads in the running, 2,556 total votes cast and, in the end, Carla Loewen was elected as the newest alumni representative on the Board of Governors. Read more.

Carla Loewen.

Carla Loewen.


Reconciliation through sport

The inaugural Sport & Reconciliation Gathering asked how we can achieve the Truth & Reconciliation Commission’s nine Calls to Action related to sport (#87 – #91) and education (#62-#65). Read more.

Boys playing hockey at the McIntosh, Ontario, school. Many students said that they would not have survived their residential school years, were it not for sports. St. Boniface Historical Society, Oblates of Mary Immaculate, Manitoba Province Fonds, SHSB 29362.

Boys playing hockey at the McIntosh, Ontario, school. Many students said that they would not have survived their residential school years, were it not for sports. St. Boniface Historical Society, Oblates of Mary Immaculate, Manitoba Province Fonds, SHSB 29362.


For those willing to travel by different route

Walking around the Fort Garry campus, you might come across some curious disc-signs with die-cut text or images of plants, water and a star-like shape. The signs are part of a project entitled “Cyclical Motion: Indigenous Art and Wayfinding.” Read more.

 

Bike kiosk mural

The bike kiosk mural, created by Indigenous artists Dee Barsy and Kenneth Lavallee and unveiled in spring 2018.

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