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Dr. Farthing is an Associate Professor at U of S' College of Kinesiology. His research focuses on Neuromuscular Physiology, with specific interest in adaptations to various types of acute and chronic strength training.

Can single arm training offset declines in function of opposing, immobile limbs?

Research Seminar Series welcomes Dr. Jon Farthing of U of S to share his research strides

September 18, 2018 — 

The Health, Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute’s Research Seminar Series kicks off it’s 2018-19 season Friday, Sept. 21.

Dr. Jon Farthing from the University of Saskatchewan presents, “Can single arm training offset declines in function of opposing, immobile limbs?”  

WHAT:  HLHPRI Research Seminar Series

WHEN: Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. 2:30pm.

WHERE:  Room 220, Active Living Centre, Fort Garry Campus

WHO: Dr. Jon Farthing, University of Saskatchewan, College of Kinesiology, “Can single arm training offset declines in function of opposing immobile limbs?”

Dr.  Farthing is an Associate Professor at U of S’ College of Kinesiology. His research focuses on Neuromuscular Physiology, with specific interest in adaptations to various types of acute and chronic strength training. Dr. Farthing is most well known for his work on “cross-education” effects – where strength training of one limb can enhance strength of both the trained and the untrained limb. His most recent work on cross-education has focused on clinical applications after injuries.

Introducing Dr. Farthing at the talk is Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management graduate studies student Cole Scheller. He will speak briefly on his area of research, methodologies of strength profile evaluation.

The HLHPRI Research Seminar Series occurs monthly during the academic year, featuring a speaker on unique and interesting topics in the realm of health, leisure and human performance. The sessions run for approximately 40 minutes each and are open to the public.

 

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