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Julienne Stroeve

Welcome to the team Dr. Julienne Stroeve.

New research chair will help forecast the future of climate change in Canada

March 29, 2018 — 

The University of Manitoba’s sea ice research team, already one of the world’s most comprehensive, innovative and well-funded, has recruited Dr. Julienne Stroeve with her expertise on complex Arctic system thanks to the Canada 150 Research Chair program.

Stroeve comes from the University College London and will serve as the Canada 150 Research Chair in Sea Ice-Climate Coupling for seven years, receiving $7 million in federal funding. Her new research program will advance the U of M’s, and Canada’s, reputation as a global centre of excellence in arctic system science.

Julienne Stroeve

“I am excited for this opportunity to advance the study of the Arctic climate system during this time of profound change,” says Stroeve.

“I am excited for this opportunity to advance the study of the Arctic climate system during this time of profound change,” says Stroeve.

The world has turned its attention to the Arctic, largely because of the rapidly shrinking sea ice cover. The increase in open water area is already having profound impacts on the energy and freshwater balance of the Arctic.

Stroeve will use satellite and ground-based data, Inuit Traditional Knowledge, community monitoring, and climate models to improve our understanding of how changes in sea ice impact climate, which then impacts sea ice in new ways, which impacts climate, and on and on. Her study of this “sea ice-climate coupling” will provide a key bridge to understanding how the Arctic affects the climate and hydrology of southern Canada. Manitoba has a keen interest in this research due to the emerging research that shows how changes in Arctic sea ice affect precipitation and temperature patterns in southern Canada.

“The University of Manitoba is proud that the Canada 150 Research Chair program recognized our trailblazing Arctic climate change research group by awarding it this chair to build on its globally-renowned strength,” said Digvir Jayas, vice-president (research and international) and Distinguished Professor at the University of Manitoba. “It is exciting to envision how Dr. Stroeve’s addition to our research teams will enhance the exceptional work underway in understanding the changes occurring in our changing climate.”

With her extensive international network, together with that of the multidisciplinary research programs within the U of M’s Arctic research group, Stroeve’s chair will provide excellent opportunities for Manitoba to recruit top graduate students from around the world, which is a pillar of the University of Manitoba’s Front and Centre campaign.

Throughout her research program, Stroeve will work with numerous regional and national Inuit and Cree organizations, and benefit from the expertise of Indigenous field investigators.

“It is a privilege to celebrate our new Canada 150 Research Chairs whose contributions to research will help support a stronger economy and a growing middle class,” said the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities.

“Their arrival also represents a brain gain for our country; a country that is earning its reputation for being open, diverse and welcoming to the scientists and strivers of the world.” 

Research at the University of Manitoba is partially supported by funding from the Government of Canada Research Support Fund.

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One comment on “New research chair will help forecast the future of climate change in Canada

  1. Witold Kinsner

    Dear Dr. Stroeve,

    Congratulations on becoming the Canada 150 Research Chair in Sea Ice-Climate Coupling, and best wishes in this important undertaking. Count on our support.

    Best regards,
    Witold Kinsner
    Professor, Cognitive Systems
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Reply

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