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The morning after the snow storm - view from Cabin window. Credit: Nariman Firoozy (CEOS)

The morning after the snow storm - view from Cabin window. Credit: Nariman Firoozy (CEOS)

The Arctic Science Partnership: Stories from the field

July 23, 2014 — 

University of Mantioba researchers and grad students are involved in the Arctic Science Partnership and have documented their first-hand accounts of life up north. The project between three internationally-recognized Arctic research centres (University of Manitoba’s Centre for Earth Observation Science (CEOS), Aarhus University (Denmark) and the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources) brings academic and research capabilities into joint research campaigns and integrated academic programs. The participants’ experiences go far beyond the science behind the project, the collaborative nature of ASP nurtures a love of the barren north, personal growth, and many new friendships. Below you’ll find the first two stories reposted  for UM Today. For more, visit asp-net.org.


To do the job I do, you need to be a little bit crazy

Ice sampling. Nicolas-Xavier Geilfus with the ice corer. Alexis Burt and Kerri Warner taking temperature readings from ice core. Credit: Bruno Delille

Ice sampling. Nicolas-Xavier Geilfus with the ice corer. Alexis Burt and Kerri Warner taking temperature readings from ice core. Credit: Bruno Delille

By Kerri Warner, Research Associate (CEOS)

Life in the field is not for everyone. There are certain luxuries that of course you miss; such as showers, clean laundry, dry clothes and your own bed. When I try to explain how my job brings me out the field to incredibly remote locations to my friends and family, I usually get the same puzzled look. I have been asked “Why would you want to leave the comfort of your own life, your routine, your friends, your family, etc. for 6 plus weeks at a time?” I usually respond that to do the job I do, you need to be a little bit crazy. You need to be an adventure seeker. You need the desire to push yourself out of your comfort zone. You need to be completely passionate about what you do.

To read the full story, click here.


A memorable first field experience in the Arctic!

Nariman Firoozy (CEOS) at the snow and ice sampling site. Scatterometer in the background. Credit: Nariman Firoozy

Nariman Firoozy (CEOS) at the snow and ice sampling site. Scatterometer in the background. Credit: Nariman Firoozy

By Nariman Firoozy, PhD candidate (CEOS)

The cabin is shaking. It’s 3 a.m. There is a storm with very intense wind. I wake up in a great fear, for our equipment at measuring site. Later in the morning and we are still trapped inside. The flame in the old furnace blows out and we are cold. We have little food and drinking water.

To read the full story, click here.

Research at the University of Manitoba is partially supported by funding from the Government of Canada Research Support Fund.

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